Overview & Procedures

Kia ora and welcome to Carew Peel Forest School's website!
This is a web space for us to share all the great things going on in our unique school. 
Carew Peel Forest School is an attractive rural school with a welcoming and friendly family atmosphere, reflecting its “Caring for” values. We are a Years 1-6 school and contribute to Geraldine High School with which the school has a Combined Board of Trustees. 
The school is situated in the heart of farmland north of the Rangitata river and between the towns of Geraldine (20kms) and Ashburton (35kms). We are near Tarahaoa and Huatekerekere (Big Mount Peel and Little Mount Peel) and are close to conservation areas. 
Our children benefit from quality learning experiences with a strong emphasis around literacy and maths in a school that is well resourced. Important to us, is children being engaged in learning in meaningful contexts. We make the most of place-based, authentic learning opportunities and the use of the amazing natural environment that surrounds us. The Enviroschools programme is integrated into our learning. Our local Pūrākau or legend, Tarahaoa and Huatekerehere, provides a known context for us to explore our bicultural heritage.
The school catchment covers a wide geographical area and almost all children are transported to school in three school-owned and operated buses, servicing the Carew, Ealing / lower Rangitata, and the Peel Forest / Rangitata Gorge / Mesopotamia areas. 
The majority of families are involved in the farming industry and over recent years the area has seen a significant shift in land use away from the traditional sheep, beef and cropping, to dairying. We now enjoy a greater cultural diversity within the school. 
The school receives and values strong community involvement and partnership. The school and the community share the swimming pool and the hall. There is an active Home and School that wants the best educational opportunities provided to their children and therefore supports children’s learning in a variety of ways. 
The whakatauki “Ko au ko koe, ko koe ko au” is interpreted by us in our setting to mean: “I am the environment, the environment is me, what I do to the environment I do to myself”.